The Glory Guys (1965)

glorguyposBy the mid 1960’s, Sam Peckinpah had written and directed many TV western shows, and also had 2 feature films to his name, The Deadly Companions and Ride the High Country. Peckinpah was quite a difficult person to work with – especially when he was directing – over his career, a trait he showed early and often. Depending on what you read, Peckinpah did a fair share of directing on 1965’s The Glory Guys only to be removed from the position.

In the American west, Capt. Demas Harrod (Tom Tryon) has been reassigned to the famous Third Cavalry stationed at Fort Doniphan. He’s served under the regiment’s power-hungry commander, General McCabe (Andrew Duggan), before and doesn’t relish the chance of doing so again. With a major campaign looming against massing Indian tribes, Harrod is assigned to D Company, a group of misfit recruits who are new to the regiment. Can he ready these inexperienced men in time for the upcoming campaign? Can he navigate a love triangle with a beautiful widow (Senta Berger) and the regiment’s chief scout (Harve Presnell)? Only time will tell.

It’s hard not to watch this film and not see the Peckinpah influence (he did write the screenplay). He would use many themes, characters and situations in his own 1965 western, Major Dundee (a personal favorite). And while it isn’t on the same level, ‘Glory’ is still pretty decent. A thinly veiled take on George Custer and the 7th Cavalry getting wiped out at the Little Big Horn, ‘Glory’ has flaws, but there are enough positives to give it a solid rating. Whether it was Peckinpah or fill-in Arnold Laven (a TV director), this western is pretty decent.

To say the least, the star power here doesn’t blow you away. Tryon and Presnell are okay, but they don’t command a lot of attention. Compare the duo to Charlton Heston and Richard Harris in ‘Dundee,’ and you see the disparity. Tryon’s Harrod is an interesting character, but there’s just not much life there. The same for Presnell’s Sol Rogers, an experienced frontier scout who should have been such a cool character. No one is done any favors by the love triangle storyline with the lovely Senta Berger, one of the dullest triangles I’ve ever seen. Harrod kinda wants her – he figures, I guess, kinda sorta – and there’s a fistfight or two but…pretty meh overall.

‘Glory’ is not surprisingly at its best when dealing with the inner workings of the Third Cavalry, and specifically Harrod’s D Company. His history with McCabe is checkered, so he wants to guarantee his inexperienced men are ready for battle. Is it traditional, even familiar stuff? Sure, but it’s handled well. Underused score (listen to the main theme HERE) from Riz Ortolani, and beautiful filming locations in Durango, Mexico (the same as ‘Dundee’) are big positives. The iconic shots of cavalry troopers silhouetted against a rising/setting sun, the traditional cavalry vs. Indians (never identified by tribe, just called ‘hostiles’), it all works pretty nicely.

The misfit recruits of D Company end up being more interesting characters than the leads actually. James Caan hams it up and chews the scenery as Dugan, the hard-drinking Irishman, with Michael Anderson Jr. basically prepping for his ‘Dundee’ role as a young trooper in love, with Slim Pickens whipping them into shape as the veteran sergeant. Also look for Adam Williams (the inexperienced trooper) and Erik Holland as Gentry, the worrying Scotsman. Also look for Wayne Rogers as Harrod’s second-in-command, and Peter Breck as the condescending, bullying Lt. Hodges.

Maybe a touch long at 112-minutes, ‘Glory’ takes a little while to get going. No real action to speak of other than a company-bonding fistfight early, but the campaign against the hostiles gets going over the last 40 minutes. There are some truly impressive sequences, hundreds of riders battling in a grassy, hilled valley as the Third (or Custer’s 7th) march into battle. Genuine scope here as we follow D Company in a beautifully done extended sequence. Who knows what Peckinpah filmed, but it speaks to a potential what-if. The quality of these scenes certainly show what was to come, both with Major Dundee and The Wild Bunch among others.

Disjointed at times, slow in other instances, ‘Glory’ is far from a perfect western. It’s highly entertaining though when it gets things right. Not easy to find, but western fans should like this one. Definitely give a watch. As sure as I say “not easy to find,” I found the full movie via Youtube. The link is below!

The Glory Guys (1965): ** ½ /****

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