The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969)

Good Guys and Bad GuysThe end of the wild west has been an ideal setting for some of the most memorable western films, notably 1969’s The Wild Bunch. It reflects the end of an era, cowboys, gunfighters and drifters squeezed out by the advances of technology and time. Inherently dark, right? Not much room for comedy, right? You’d think. Reflecting the changing times in the west, 1969’s The Good Guys and the Bad Guys tries to tread that fine line right down the middle.

In the town of Progress, Marshall Jim Flagg (Robert Mitchum) catches wind of reports that a gang of outlaws has been spotted in the area. He figures they’re hovering around waiting to hit a train carrying an immense amount of money, but Progress’ mayor (Martin Balsam) isn’t having it. To shut up his veteran marshall, Mayor Wilker puts Flagg out to pasture, retiring him. Flagg instead takes matters into his own hand. He tries to stop the gang himself, a group led by young gunfighter, Waco (David Carradine), but his plan goes off course almost immediately. Now, Flagg must work with an old rival and an infamous bank robber, John McKay (George Kennedy), to stop Waco from hitting the train in time.

Between 1966-1969, Mitchum made 8 movies (so much for slowing down later in your career). Six of the eight were westerns ranging from near classics, 1966’s El Dorado to lesser flicks, like Young Billy Young. Mitchum seemed to know what his fans wanted — or at least what he liked doing as an actor. Reading his biography, Mitchum enjoyed making westerns, so he stuck with the genre. Why fix something that isn’t broken? From director Burt Kennedy, ‘Good Guys’ doesn’t rewrite the genre, but it’s pretty fun, able to inject some humor into a buddy story dynamic about the end of the wild west.

As the rivals who aren’t so different, Mitchum and Kennedy bring the movie up a notch from what would have been a much lesser western without strong actors in these roles. It’s the early 1900s and for better or worse, the duo has ‘outlived their usefulness’ as technology and the changing times have pushed gun-toting peace officers and bank robbers out the door. After they return to town, the two have a great scene as they discuss what used to be and how things aren’t like they used to be. Flagg’s been relieved of his duties and McKay has been left behind by his gang. So with nothing else to do, the former marshal and the former outlaw say ‘what the hell?’ and team up.

I’ll recommend this movie mostly because of Mitchum, a long-time movie star, and Kennedy, who was still relatively new to movies after spending years in guest starring spots on TV shows. As always, Mitchum has this ease of making characters likable, and it’s nice to see him in a good guy role. He was known for playing roguish brutes who were ultimately good, but Flagg is good through and through, even getting his own theme song. Kennedy gets some good laughs as McKay and has some great chemistry with Mitchum in their scenes together.

Balsam is a scene-stealer as Mayor Wilker, a local politician who has his eyes set on higher levels of government….while also seducing the married Tina Louise. Carradine isn’t given much to do (and no background), but he’s an impressive screen presence, even this young. John Davis Chandler is the only member of his gang to stand out as the unhinged Deuce. Douglas Fowley is excellent as Grundy, an old mountain man who sides with Flagg in trouble. Also look for Lois Nettleton, John Carradine, an uncredited Buddy Hackett, Marie Windsor and Dick Peabody.

The movie is at its best when dealing with Flagg and McKay in serious fashion. I’ve never been a fan of comedic westerns to begin with, and most of the attempts at humor here fall short. Balsam gets some genuine laughs, but the physical comedy comes up empty. The action is solid, especially the finale over the last 25 minutes or so as Flagg, McKay, Waco and his gang and Mayor Wilker and the entire town of Progress duke it out for control of the train. There are some pretty cool tracking shots — must have used a helicopter — showing the mass chaos of the chase.

Absolutely nothing spectacular about this one –check that, the New Mexico locations are beautiful– but as you’ve most likely figured out, a western has to be bottom of the barrel for me not to find something redeeming about it. Watch this one for typically strong performances from Robert Mitchum and George Kennedy and a great supporting part for Martin Balsam.

The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969): ** 1/2 /****

 

2 thoughts on “The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969)

  1. Kind of like this one and that has a lot to do with the two leading men and of course it’s a western

  2. Tim O'Brien says:

    It’s solid! And sometimes that’s all you need with a western.

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