Quigley Down Under (1990)

quigley_down_underWorking regularly since the 1970’s, Tom Selleck has had plenty of success on TV, including Magnum PI, Blue Bloods and the Jesse Stone movies, not to mention recurring roles on several other series. He’s been a staple in the western genre too, especially a handful of memorable TV movies. One of his best though was released theatrically in 1990 and has been a fan favorite ever since, Quigley Down Under.

An American marksman who’s gained a reputation with his modified Sharps rifle, Matthew Quigley (Selleck) is traveling to Australia in search of a job. An Australian rancher, Elliott Marston (Alan Rickman), has searched around the world for the best long-range marksmen for a job, and he thinks he’s found his man in Quigley. The job? It’s not as advertised. Marston is having a problem with the natives with the Aborigines in the area killing his cattle. They’ve learned to avoid his men and their rifles though. In steps Quigley hopefully, picking them off from long-range. Quigley isn’t having it though and is double-crossed by Marston and his men. Along with a crazy woman, Cora (Laura San Giacomo), Quigley is left for dead in the Australian outback. Can they survive? Can they exact revenge on Marston in the process?

I learned something while researching this movie. This 1990 flick from director Simon Wincer (Lonesome Dove) is known as a “neo-western.” It’s far from your typical western, obviously doesn’t take place in America, and is made with almost an entirely Australian cast. Whatever you wanna call it or classify it as, know this. It’s very good. It was filmed on-location in Australia and looks amazing. Wincer pairs again with composer Basil Poledouris again after their success with Lonesome Dove, and the result is a great, memorable score. It sounds part Lonesome Dove, part The Son of Katie Elder. Give it an extended listen HERE.

‘Quigley’ was in the works since the late 1970’s with Steve McQueen (can you imagine that?!?), Clint Eastwood and Harrison Ford all considered for the part. It ultimately went to Selleck, and that’s just fine! Selleck looks like a cowboy. He acts like one. He sounds like one. I love his Quigley character because it is so fish out of water, and you don’t often see that with the archetypal western hero. Usually those stories take place in…well, the American west. He’s got an imposing presence and brings a calming energy to the proceedings. No matter what gets thrown at him — a lot gets thrown at him — Quigley rolls with the punches. He’s a man of his word and expects others to do so too. A great character to lead the way.

Fresh off the immense success of Die Hard, Rickman is a scene-stealer as Marston. If anything, he’s underused. Marston is fascinated by the American west, making himself into a fast draw artist and is like an adoring fan when he meets Quigley. And let’s get right to it. That voice….that voice. I’d listen to the man read the phone book. San Giacomo is good as Crazy Cora, but the character is a little overdone at times. Her backstory is fascinating and her chemistry with Selleck is excellent, but it gets laid on a little thick at times. Some of Marston’s men include Tony Bonner, Jerome Ehlers and a very young Ben Mendelsohn. Chris Haywood plays Ashley-Pitt, a British officer hunting deserters who has a history with Marston.

At 119 minutes, ‘Quigley’ drags a little in the middle portions. It drifts at times, all with an eye of where it needs to get. More of a character study than an action movie, there is more action in the last hour as Quigley and his Sharps rifle go to work on Marston’s empire. With Poledouris’ music, the outback backdrop and Selleck’s star power, there are some moments of pure perfection. The final showdown? A perfect twist that’s delivered in a great fast draw shootout.

Just a good western. Unique but nothing crazy, it’s a must-watch for Selleck and western fans.

Quigley Down Under (1990): ***/****