The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969)

Good Guys and Bad GuysThe end of the wild west has been an ideal setting for some of the most memorable western films, notably 1969’s The Wild Bunch. It reflects the end of an era, cowboys, gunfighters and drifters squeezed out by the advances of technology and time. Inherently dark, right? Not much room for comedy, right? You’d think. Reflecting the changing times in the west, 1969’s The Good Guys and the Bad Guys tries to tread that fine line right down the middle.

In the town of Progress, Marshall Jim Flagg (Robert Mitchum) catches wind of reports that a gang of outlaws has been spotted in the area. He figures they’re hovering around waiting to hit a train carrying an immense amount of money, but Progress’ mayor (Martin Balsam) isn’t having it. To shut up his veteran marshall, Mayor Wilker puts Flagg out to pasture, retiring him. Flagg instead takes matters into his own hand. He tries to stop the gang himself, a group led by young gunfighter, Waco (David Carradine), but his plan goes off course almost immediately. Now, Flagg must work with an old rival and an infamous bank robber, John McKay (George Kennedy), to stop Waco from hitting the train in time.

Between 1966-1969, Mitchum made 8 movies (so much for slowing down later in your career). Six of the eight were westerns ranging from near classics, 1966’s El Dorado to lesser flicks, like Young Billy Young. Mitchum seemed to know what his fans wanted — or at least what he liked doing as an actor. Reading his biography, Mitchum enjoyed making westerns, so he stuck with the genre. Why fix something that isn’t broken? From director Burt Kennedy, ‘Good Guys’ doesn’t rewrite the genre, but it’s pretty fun, able to inject some humor into a buddy story dynamic about the end of the wild west.

As the rivals who aren’t so different, Mitchum and Kennedy bring the movie up a notch from what would have been a much lesser western without strong actors in these roles. It’s the early 1900s and for better or worse, the duo has ‘outlived their usefulness’ as technology and the changing times have pushed gun-toting peace officers and bank robbers out the door. After they return to town, the two have a great scene as they discuss what used to be and how things aren’t like they used to be. Flagg’s been relieved of his duties and McKay has been left behind by his gang. So with nothing else to do, the former marshal and the former outlaw say ‘what the hell?’ and team up.

I’ll recommend this movie mostly because of Mitchum, a long-time movie star, and Kennedy, who was still relatively new to movies after spending years in guest starring spots on TV shows. As always, Mitchum has this ease of making characters likable, and it’s nice to see him in a good guy role. He was known for playing roguish brutes who were ultimately good, but Flagg is good through and through, even getting his own theme song. Kennedy gets some good laughs as McKay and has some great chemistry with Mitchum in their scenes together.

Balsam is a scene-stealer as Mayor Wilker, a local politician who has his eyes set on higher levels of government….while also seducing the married Tina Louise. Carradine isn’t given much to do (and no background), but he’s an impressive screen presence, even this young. John Davis Chandler is the only member of his gang to stand out as the unhinged Deuce. Douglas Fowley is excellent as Grundy, an old mountain man who sides with Flagg in trouble. Also look for Lois Nettleton, John Carradine, an uncredited Buddy Hackett, Marie Windsor and Dick Peabody.

The movie is at its best when dealing with Flagg and McKay in serious fashion. I’ve never been a fan of comedic westerns to begin with, and most of the attempts at humor here fall short. Balsam gets some genuine laughs, but the physical comedy comes up empty. The action is solid, especially the finale over the last 25 minutes or so as Flagg, McKay, Waco and his gang and Mayor Wilker and the entire town of Progress duke it out for control of the train. There are some pretty cool tracking shots — must have used a helicopter — showing the mass chaos of the chase.

Absolutely nothing spectacular about this one –check that, the New Mexico locations are beautiful– but as you’ve most likely figured out, a western has to be bottom of the barrel for me not to find something redeeming about it. Watch this one for typically strong performances from Robert Mitchum and George Kennedy and a great supporting part for Martin Balsam.

The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969): ** 1/2 /****

 

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Hombre (1967)

hombre_28film29Ask most western fans what their favorite Paul Newman western is, and I’d say 9 times out of 10, you’d get “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” back. I’d say it. It’s a classic and deserves its status. Let’s not forget about 1967’s Hombre though, an underrated gem featuring one of Newman’s all-time best performances.

It’s the late 1800’s in the Arizona territory. John Russell (Newman) is a white man who was kidnapped at a young age by Apaches and raised as one of their own. Now a grown man, he associates more with the Apaches than white people. His adopted father though has passed away, leaving him a boarding house to decide what to do with. Russell sells it for a string of horses and takes a stagecoach to finish the deal. On-board, he finds his presence is less than welcome by his fellow passengers. The irony? One of the passengers intends to rob the others on the trail, and John’s skillset as a capable fighter and more than capable frontiersman will be more necessary than ever.

Point of conversation: This is a difficult movie to write a plot synopsis for. I don’t want to give too much away because in a somewhat messaged-based story, there are some good twists and turns along the way. It has some touches of Stagecoach, but in a more brutal, honest way. Hey, it was 1967 as opposed to 1939. Times had a’ changed!

From director Martin Ritt, ‘Hombre’ is one of the first — and best — revisionist westerns that began to look at the American west in a more honest fashion. They weren’t as white-washed as some 1950’s efforts and weren’t as flashy or exaggerated as spaghetti westerns. ‘Hombre’ takes the side of the Apache tribe who by the late 1800s was mostly in poorly-run reservations. We hear more about their plight, especially in quick, understated dialogue, and through one of several twists revealed about halfway through the movie. The bad guys then? Well, technically, everyone. Let’s cut to the chase though. The white folks don’t come off smelling like roses. It’s a fascinating story because it is so different from so many other genre entries.

Now for that Paul Newman fella. Playing John Russell, Newman steals this scene, seemingly without breaking a sweat. His dialogue is minimal, and when he does speak, he gets his message across in short, direct lines. His physical mannerisms are striking, his movements similarly minimalist. It’s just a fascinating character. Russell has chosen basically to live as an Apache warrior, leaving his white roots behind. He feels more at home with the Apaches and their way of life. In his fellow white passengers, he sees prejudice, racism, brutality, and maybe in most aggravating fashion, assumptions based on nothing but rumors. It’s only too perfect that these individuals come to depend on Russell for their very survival.

‘Hombre’ is interesting for a whole lot of reasons, but the biggest? Even with Newman’s Russell, there isn’t really a single sympathetic character in sight. You come to appreciate Russell’s personality and general intention, but sympathetic? Nope. As for the other passengers, look for Jessie (Diane Cilento), an out of work boarding house owner, Fredric March as Favor, the Indian agent, Barbara Rush as his wife, Richard Boone as the surly Cicero Grimes, Martin Balsam as Mendez, the stagecoach driver, and Peter Lazer and Margaret Blye as young married couple working through some issues. Cilento is especially good, the conscious of the movie and a conversational counter to Russell as their situation gets ever more dangerous.

Who else to look for? Keep an eye out for western regulars Frank Silvera, Cameron Mitchell, Val Avery and a pre-All My Children David Canary. Silvera is also a scene-stealer as an unnamed Mexican bandit. His scenes with Newman crackle.

Clocking in at 111 minutes, ‘Hombre’ isn’t fast-paced or action-packed. It is more of a slow burn full of tension, betrayal and some surprises along the way. Composer David Rose’s score isn’t big and booming, mostly relying instead on one memorable, quiet theme. Filmed on location in Arizona, it is a stunner of a flick. The desert and its barren qualities end up being a key additional character.

It all builds to one of the more startling endings I’ve seen in a western. Sticking with its realistic, downbeat tone, the finale features one of the more realistic shootouts I’ve ever seen in a western. Newman owns the last scenes, spewing one-liners with a bite. The movie is full of quick, snappy and biting dialogue, and what would you expect from a screenplay based off an Elmore Leonard novel? I guess I forgot to mention that earlier! Any-hoo, so much to recommend here. I liked this western more on my recent viewing than I ever have before. A must-see for western fans.

Hombre (1967): *** 1/2 /****